Hot Stuff

Nebru 7 Pod*

A most briefe and pleasaunte treatise teachyng how to dresse, sowe and set a garden**

Chillies and why you should try growing them. Variety is the spice of life and these spicy plants have variety in spades. You will never run out of variations in size, color, and shape or heat level. There is at least one out there perfect for you.

Before moving on to some ‘why you shoulds’ let’s look at some ‘why you won’ts’.


A most briefe and pleasaunte treatise teachyng how to dresse, sowe and set a garden*

If there are any interested in giving it a go after reading this I have put together a variety pack of seeds. Heat from zero to world’s hottest. Colours, red, white, chocolate, yellow, peach. Shapes, pea shaped, 30 cm ‘ribbons’, ‘normal’. Large plant, small 30-60cm plants. Included in each bundle will be growing instructions. Or more accurately what I have found to work in WA. Drop a note to ‘management’ or leave a message on the blog and we will get them out to you.

Chillies and why you should try growing them. Variety is the spice of life and these spicy plants have variety in spades. You will never run out of variations in size, color, and shape or heat level. There is at least one out there perfect for you.

Before moving on to some ‘why you shoulds’ let’s look at some ‘why you won’ts’.

A small or no garden at all? There are plants that happily grow indoors in 150-200mm pots, just provide some sunshine. But even then I grew a specimen of the then world’s hottest chillie which never received direct sunlight. Apart from leaves displaying ‘gigantism’ it was fine. The beauty of the chillie plant is that you do not have to have a big garden to grow sufficient quantities. One or two plants can supply you for months. A super hot one will keep you supplied with fresh and dried chillie spice all year.

2) A Hot & Spicy Food Wimp? Definitely not an excuse. There are varieties as mild as a capsicum. There is also no need to actually eat them. Many look great just as an ornamental. The pods can be any number of colors and shapes and look good against the green foliage, lasting for weeks or months. There are some who sport purple leaves for added colour.

3) Lack a green thumb? You are in luck. While there are some chillies that need a bit of tlc there are others that are relatively tough. Ones such as the Tepin/Chiltepin, the State Chillie of Texas. They grow in semi arid areas. I have found chillies to be relatively pest and disease free. Although where you live might have voracious insects and plant lurgies we do not have in the Wild Wild West The big secret is maintaining water supply and an occasional feed. 

The chilli growing bug bit me over 20 years ago, prompted by a simple desire. Since then it has provided many joys and the occasional disappointment. But always there is next season, renewed hope, new varieties and this time doing it right’.

A small or no garden at all? There are plants that happily grow indoors in 150-200mm pots, just provide some sunshine. But even then I grew a specimen of the then world’s hottest chillie which never received direct sunlight. Apart from leaves displaying ‘gigantism’ it was fine. The beauty of the chillie plant is that you do not have to have a big garden to grow sufficient quantities. One or two plants can supply you for months. A super hot one will keep you supplied with fresh and dried chillie spice all year.

2) A Hot & Spicy Food Wimp? Definitely not an excuse. There are varieties as mild as a capsicum. There is also no need to actually eat them. Many look great just as an ornamental. The pods can be any number of colors and shapes and look good against the green foliage, lasting for weeks or months. There are some who sport purple leaves for added colour.

3) Lack a green thumb? You are in luck. While there are some chillies that need a bit of tlc there are others that are relatively tough. Ones such as the Tepin/Chiltepin, the State Chillie of Texas. They grow in semi arid areas. I have found chillies to be relatively pest and disease free. Although where you live might have voracious insects and plant lurgies we do not have in the Wild Wild West The big secret is maintaining water supply and an occasional feed. 

The chilli growing bug bit me over 20 years ago, prompted by a simple desire. Since then it has provided many joys and the occasional disappointment. But always there is next season, renewed hope, new varieties and this time doing it right’.

One of the great adventures the growing of chillies takes you on is a trip from the garden to the world’s kitchens. Across the globe there are a myriad of cuisines that call for particular chillies prepared in a particular way. Be it the incredibly useful smokey Merkin powder of the Mapuche people using Cacho de Cabre chillies or Prik Kaeng Kiao Wan (a green curry) from Thailand using Green Bird Eye chillies to Hungarian Sajtos Toltott Paprika using Hungarian Wax chillies. The heat scale of the dishes ranging from mild to wild……………………well. nuclear J . I may have been growing chillies for a long time but I still prefer not to mix pain and pleasure. The foolproof formula is – it’s twice as hot, use half as much !

The ‘heat’ from chillies comes from several related chemicals called Capsaicins. To show you the difference a few atoms make, capsaicin is a vanilloid, a ‘cuzzy bro’ of vanilla. Heat is measured on the Scoville Heat Units scale. Word of the day ‘Organoleptic’. Organoleptic testing was how the heat level of chillies was originally measured. It often still is. It sounds ‘high tech’ but it really is ‘suck it and see’. The Scoville rating measures how many times a measure of chillie can be diluted using sugar water and ‘heat’ still be detected by a panel of tasters .To give you an idea of how hot is hot and how NOT HOT a Jalapeno actually is…..

Chilli Scovile Heat Units (SHU)
Jalapeno2,500-8,000
Thai Birds Eye50,000-100,000
Habanero100,000-350,000
Pepper Spray2,000,000+
Carolina Reaper (world’s hottest)1,650,000-2,200,00

The ‘burn’ from capsaicins has a couple of interesting aspects, it stimulates the same pain pathway as an actual burn. Unlike other hot spices such as pepper, the body becomes increasingly tolerant to the effects of capsaicins. Like drug addicts, chillieheads need larger and larger doses to get the endorphin rush.

In addition to the culinary world there is, if you wish to enter it, a large community of ‘chillieheads’ out there. People who will help you out with advice, hints, seeds or recipes. No one is going to get rich out of the hobby so none of the crap which goes along with anything that involves big bucks or hope for big bucks. A number of Australian cities have chillie festivals. Drop in to one when they, eventually, run again.

Lastly, there is the simple pleasure of growing something. Watching something go from seed to setting fruit is just a few months. The plants look good, taste good and are the fruits of your own labour. The chillies themselves can often be a great conversation starter or common point of interest with others. There is always someone in your circle who likes a bit of HOT …

… and you can provide it. They will appreciate something different to the limited variety sold in shops. Especially if it is a very hot one as they are rarely available. Although I did see a local Coled selling the world’s hottest chillie in late 2019, Carolina Reaper, $5.50 for 10 grams , OMG $550 a kg !!!. So even if they are too hot for you there will be someone that will greatly appreciate some fresh ones.

Kitchen Korner. Last season I tried making a Lactofermented Chillie sauce. The chillie version of the sour dough bread craze. Lacto sauces became ‘trendy’, chock full of buzz words like “probiotic’ so they ‘gotta be good’ eh? The ubiquitous Tabasco sauce uses the method. If you have been to Asian eating places you likely came across Sriracha chillie sauce, another lactofermented sauce. Once you know the basics it is very easy and non labour intensive.

Lactofermentation

Apart from the sauces mentioned you will already be familiar with foods produced using this method, kimchi and sauerkraut. The process involves putting fruit/spices/vegetables in a brine strong enough to kill off the ‘bad’ bacteria but not the lactobacillus that naturally live on the fruit and vege.The same bugs that spoil milk. As they digest the sugars they produce lactic acid which lowers the pH and so preserves the vegetable. Apart from general cleanliness THE one thing to remember is to end up with about 2.5% salt.

 

Equipment.

Fermentation Jar.

Although there are jars designed specifically for this, an Agee jar or similar is quite OK to use. Whatever jar you choose make up enough of the ingredients to fill with 5 or so cm from the top. During fermentation the jar needs to be sealed from the air. If you have a container with an air lock, fantastic. If not then 1/2 to 3/4 fill a resealable plastic bag with water. Place it on top of the brine and sauce ingredients so as to exclude contact with air and keep the ingredients below the surface.

Ingredients

A basic recipe. Adjust quantities to suit your jar.

1)     Rock/Sea Salt. NOT iodised salt

2)     Boiled and cooled water. Roughly enough to fill your glass container

3)     350g Green Jalapeno. Type of chillie and quantity to suit your taste

4)     225g chopped celery, stalk and leaves

5)     1 chopped green bell pepper or one that matches colour of chillies

6)     2 cloves garlic minced. (optional)

7)     1 medium onion sliced

8)     1 tsp coriander seeds

Weigh ingredients 3 to 8. Then weigh out 2.5% of their weight in rock salt/sea salt. Put salt to one side. (easy peasy calc., just divide  weight by 40)

Place vegetables and spices into jar. Pack down a little. Pour in water until water is a cm or two above the sauce ingredients.

Pour the water back out of the jar and measure its weight. Divide weight by 40 and add that quantity of rock/sea salt to the water. Also add the salt you weighed out for sauce ingredients 3 to 8. Dissolve the salt and then pour back into the jar of ingredients. Seal the jar with the zip lock bag of water. Ensure all the ingredients are a cm or two below the surface of the brine.

Fermentation should begin in 1-4 days. During fermentation a white ‘powder’ may form on the surface. This is Kahm yeast. Not dangerous but supposedly gives a bitter taste. Just carefully skim it off the top. Easy to do as it is extremely hydrophobic.

Leave to ferment for 2-4 weeks. You can process it then or wait a little longer to let the flavours develop. I left a mash of pure Carolina Reaper for 6 months. The original Tabasco was left 2-3 years.

Processing. After fermentation strain out sauce ingredients and retain the liquid. Place the veggie/spice mix in a blender. Turn on the blender and slowly add the retained fluid until the sauce is of the consistency you want. A good option is to add ¼ cup of apple cider vinegar before adding the liquid. Adding ½ tablespoon citric acid will also help preserve it or the juice of a lemon instead

Once the sauce has been ‘blitzed’ you can either work it through a sieve to remove pulp or use as is. The extra work of getting it through the sive means your sauce should not separate on sitting. I never bother. Just keep it in the fridge and shake before use.

At the start of this I mentioned my chillie adventure started 20+ years ago from a simple desire. What was that desire? Revenge! While watching cricket and enjoying a few cleansing ales with a Scottish mate – he kept munching on some homemade pickled chillies he’d made. Eventually he offered me one, assuring me they were nae hot. Following his example and taking his word I tore into one. 10 seconds later “I’m melting’. I did not realise back then that you become tolerant to effects of capsaicin ‘with practice’, he had lots of ‘practice’. A month later I read an article about a new world record chillie in the US and a plan was born. Not legally exportable at the time and e-commerce in the early days I set about getting seeds and growing some. 18 months after ‘the incident’ a very very cold dish of ‘revenge’ was served. Ah the sweet sight of a gruff Glaswegian from The Gorbals trying to make out he was not in agony despite the gasping, red face, tears and sweat dripping off him. He did very well though considering how much of the pod he ate. So here’s to you Alex me old mate, now in the great Highlands in the Sky. Thank you for the road you sent me down,

*Nebru 7 Pod .Kaffeeklatscher is the very proud ‘parent’ of this variety. An accidental cross I grew that turned out to be ‘most excellent’ and now sold in places as far away as Texas and Croatia. It has earned for me exactly $0.00 but inner ‘chuffedness ‘= Priceless.

**Thomas Hill . Published 1588.

FREE STUFF FOR PUB PATRONS

If there are any interested in giving it a go after reading this I have put together a variety pack of seeds. Heat from zero to world’s hottest. Colours, red, white, chocolate, yellow, peach. Shapes, pea shaped, 30 cm ‘ribbons’, ‘normal’. Large plant, small 30-60cm plants. Included in each bundle will be growing instructions. Or more accurately what I have found to work in WA. Send an email to poroti2ATbigpond.com if you would like one and I will post one to your avatar.

943 thoughts on “Hot Stuff

  1. I hope this works

    Tony Burke 5&5

    We need to talk about Scott. Usually when someone makes a terrible mistake you can see the embarrassment on their face. But Scott seemed happy. He felt invincible, like a genius. After one of the worst weeks I’ve ever seen a government have.

    So as you read this week’s #5and5 just remember this: Scott thought he did really well.

    BEST

    The Muppet Show Sequel
    Morrison’s character
    Cost of living
    Same job, same pay
    Tony Smith’s farewell
    WORST

    Hawaii lie
    Civil disobedience
    Corruption
    “Made up issue”
    Christian Porter

    1. Chaos. Everywhere. And Anthony Albanese summed it up beautifully in a speech at the end of the week. He recalled when Mr Morrison described his own side as a muppet show: “Well he is now the Muppet-In-Chief. And the theme song to The Muppet Show goes like this: it’s like a kind of torture to have to watch the show.”

    PIC: The Guardian/Mike Bowers

    2. Every day this week we zeroed in on Mr Morrison’s character. The challenge when we were organising question time each day was choosing among the long list of Morrison lies. Why did he and his office repeatedly lie about going to Hawaii while the country burned? Why did he lie about electric vehicles? Why did he lie about battery power? Why did he lie about vaccine mandates? Why did he lie about inviting his friend Brian Houston to the White House? In response Mr Morrison just ducked and dissembled – and even bowled up some brand new lies. As Richard Marles asked on Thursday: “If the Prime Minister has no regard for what he said in the past why should Australians have regard for what he’s saying now?”

    3. While the government was focused on itself we focused on the economy and the cost of living – things that matter to everyday Australians. Anthony, Amanda Rishworth, Kristy McBain and Susan Templeman asked why under this government petrol prices were surging by $900 a year for an average family – but real wages have fallen by $700. Josh Frydenberg tried to pivot to the government’s economic record, so Jim Chalmers asked: “Can the current Treasurer name any other Treasurer in the last 100 years that has a worse record than him on waste, rorts, debt, deficits, annual growth and real wages?” Frydenberg could not.

    4. On Monday Anthony and Labor’s Meryl Swanson introduced a “same job, same pay” Private Members’ Bill to crack down on dodgy labour hire firms that are undercutting wages and conditions in mining and across the economy. Throughout the week we presented real life examples of labour hire workers getting ripped off to the tune of hundreds of dollars a week. We need to stop permanent jobs being replaced with lower paid casual jobs.

    PIC: The Guardian/Mike Bowers

    5. Monday was Tony Smith’s last day as Speaker. He’s from the other side of politics of course but few would dispute that Smith brought order, fairness, dignity and integrity back to the chair after the Bronwyn Bishop days. He belongs in the “best” column even though we’re sorry to see him go.

    1. Mr Morrison’s character was on full display on Monday. Labor’s Fiona Phillips asked: “When my electorate was burning the Prime Minister’s office told journalists he was not on holiday in Hawaii. Why did the Prime Minister’s office say that when it wasn’t true?” Mr Morrison responded by trying to blame Labor – claiming he’d told Anthony Albanese ahead of time where he was going. If that was true it would be irrelevant. But it wasn’t true at all. Mr Morrison was trying to wriggle out of his lies by telling more lies. He had to have two goes at correcting the record because he’s pathologically incapable of admitting fault or taking responsibility.

    PIC: The Guardian/Mike Bowers

    2. The LNP’s George Christensen stood up in the House on Wednesday and likened state premiers to “Stalin, Mao, Hitler and Pol Pot” – and then openly encouraged “civil disobedience” against their pandemic health orders. A few minutes later we asked Mr Morrison about these inflammatory and dangerous comments and he refused to even condemn Mr Christensen by name. Watch here.

    3. On Thursday things went from bad to worse for the government. Supported by Labor, independent MP Helen Haines moved a motion to suspend standing orders to debate her bill for a federal anti-corruption body. In a totally unprecedented move a Liberal MP, Bridget Archer, seconded the motion and crossed the floor to support it. That means we had the numbers on the floor. After the vote the new Speaker Andrew Wallace declared that we’d won – but then saying we needed to vote again. That led to complete chaos on the floor as the government tried to get its act together and figure out what to do next. There was around ten minutes where we all sat in the chamber and nothing happened. No one spoke. Just. Nothing. Eventually the vote happened again and this time the requirement to have an absolute majority of 76 votes was invoked which mean even though we had more votes, we didn’t win. There’s one simple take out from all this, the only way to have an anti-corruption commission is to change the government.

    PIC: The Guardian/Mike Bowers

    4. We asked the government about the Same Job Same Pay legislation that Anthony Albanese had introduced on Monday. What was the government’s response? Paul Fletcher – who represents the Invisible Industrial Relations Minister Michaelia Cash in the lower house – just arrogantly dismissed the labour hire rorts as a “made up issue”. I bet it doesn’t feel “made up” to the workers getting paid less every day or the families struggling to pay the bills. It only feels “made up” to a Government that is completely out of touch with the concerns of workers.

    5. A few weeks ago the government took the completely unprecedented step of voting against a parliamentary inquiry into Christian Porter’s anonymous donations even though Tony Smith supported a referral. With a new Speaker in the chair I gave it another go. Mr Wallace rejected our request. So we are left with a situation where MPs can take large anonymous cash donations to pay for private bills. It’s beyond belief.

    We’re back next week for the final sitting week of the year.

    ‘til then,

    Tony

    PS Song of the week goes to one of the early punk albums. It includes the perfect line “broke a confidence just to please your ego”. The song is called Liar. And while I never thought I’d say this: in honour of Scott Morrison, here’s the Sex Pistols.

  2. Paul Keating’s response to Peter Dutton . . .

    At today’s Press Club event, Minister Peter Dutton outlined a chillingly aggressive and unrealistic scenario as to Australia’s foreign and defence posture in the region.

    A posture which is unremittingly unrealistic and inappropriate to Australia’s vulnerable geographic circumstances.

    Peter Dutton is a dangerous personality, who unfortunately is the Minister of Defence in Australia. Peter Dutton, by his incautious utterances, persists in injecting Australia into a potentially explosive situation in North Asia – a situation Australia is not in any position to manage or control, let alone to succeed and prosper in.

    As a central minister in the Morrison government, with strategic responsibilities, Peter Dutton ignored and went out of his way to ignore, attempts by President Biden in his recent meeting with President Xi Jinping, to reach some sort of understanding or détente in the relationship between United States and China. At today’s Press Club event, Minister Peter Dutton outlined a chillingly aggressive and unrealistic scenario as to Australia’s foreign and defence posture in the region.

  3. Scovid and Grunt say Australia has nothing to worry about

    https://www.9news.com.au/world/south-africa-coronavirus-variant-everything-to-know-about-the-b11529-covid19-variant/30c0a077-9e7f-40c5-893e-218c4cfbb855

  4. Longish

    By RonniSalt

    November 26, 2021

    Australians had some world-class news coverage this month when Scott Morrison slumped in a barber’s chair before thrusting a limp sausage at unsuspecting RSL veterans, all in the name of political journalism. Unlike other times in his career, however, this time Morrison knew where the sharp blade was coming from.

    https://theshot.net.au/general-news/scott-morrison-not-with-a-bang-but-a-whimper/

  5. 2gravel at 8:56 AM

    A belated best wishes and all that for your ‘big wait’. It must be terribly stressful for you both. I wish there was something I could do more than uselessly crossing my fingers and wishing you and Razz the best. Keep us posted here in the lounge. There are some very good listeners who hang out here.

    • Thanks, Kaffee. I just needed to vent, but have to say all medical people involved have been excellent. It’s the frustrating part of watching Razz struggling. Bad timing on our part. Just as the town is hit with a covid outbreak that we have managed to avoid all this time.

  6. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    Peter Hartcher is concerned that Australia is rudderless in the face of growing storm. He says, “We know from the US that even an entrenched democracy quickly can drive itself to the brink of failure. Australia is not in the same state of decay at the moment, yet it’s subject to some of the same pressures and has some of the same vulnerabilities.” This is a cracker!
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/the-nation-is-rudderless-in-the-face-of-growing-storm-20211125-p59c8f.html
    Laura Tingle writes that COVID gave us a once-in-a-lifetime natural experiment — but Scott Morrison has turned his back on the lessons.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-27/covid-once-in-a-lifetime-experiment-jobkeeper-wages-economy/100654538
    It was hard to keep up during Scott Morrison’s horror week. It would help if he could get his story straight, says Katherine Murphy.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/nov/27/it-was-hard-to-keep-up-during-scott-morrisons-horror-week-it-would-help-if-he-could-get-his-story-straight
    John Hewson goes straight to Morrison’s election lies. Hewson’s major, longer-term structural concern is that Morrison and his government have seriously undermined our democracy with their almost sole focus on winning elections rather than addressing the many very serious and urgent policy challenges that lay before us as a nation, now and into the future.
    https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/opinion/topic/2021/11/27/scott-morrisons-election-lies/163793160012965
    Nick Bonyhady reports that Anthony Albanese has accused Prime Minister Scott Morrison of ignoring the separation between the government and the law by castigating the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption as a “kangaroo court”.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/albanese-says-pm-has-no-concept-of-separation-of-powers-after-icac-spray-20211126-p59clb.html
    “Anthony Albanese is convinced the tide is going out on the Morrison government. Scott Morrison senses it too, but, like King Canute, he is desperately trying to prove he’s still in control”, writes Paul Bongiorno who in the article examines the questions of character. A good read.
    https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/opinion/topic/2021/11/27/question-characters/163793160012973
    The SMH says that, as the federal election draws ever closer, the federal government’s failure to establish a serious anti-corruption body is becoming a serious liability for the Coalition. It calls for Morrison to honour his election commitment.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/morrison-must-honour-promise-for-a-federal-icac-20211126-p59cl7.html
    Michelle Grattan writes that in a week of chaos, with revolts on the left and the right, there was one encouraging sign. She says that when several moderates spoke out in the Coalition party room, airing their reservations about the Religious Discrimination Bill, or aspects of it, it was the most significant indication so far, they aren’t willing to be quiescent any longer.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/in-a-week-of-chaos-with-revolts-on-the-left-and-the-right-there-was-one-encouraging-sign-20211126-p59ccv.html
    The mood in the governing Coalition is unusually volatile in the run-up to the election. The best cure would be to have some policy to talk about, says the editorial in the AFR.
    https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/amid-the-chaos-scott-morrison-must-still-think-ahead-20211124-p59bmg
    The best part of Phil Coorey’s evaluation of Morrison’s chances at the election is at its end, where he says the government’ “lack of a strong legislative agenda has been a feature of the past three years, something that was forgivable at the height of the pandemic. But having no real agenda to prosecute when the Parliament sits allows others to fill the void, and with question time and press conferences every day, there is no escape.”
    https://www.afr.com/politics/crunch-time-for-the-coalition-as-an-election-approaches-20211125-p59c4c
    Petr van Onselen says there is a bleak picture for the Coalition if it doesn’t find a way to win next year’s election. After the 2007 defeat the risk of long-term factional wounds opening up was high, but Labor made a meal of government and the Coalition found itself back in, in relatively rapid time, papering over ideological schisms that were never addressed.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/time-running-out-for-pms-date-with-thepeople/news-story/f32c67dd0dc3b85947df2f170628f70a
    According to the AFR, Qantas boss Alan Joyce has cautioned the Morrison government against allowing divisive and inflammatory acts under new religious freedom laws, warning vulnerable Australians could be harmed by legal protections for comments such as Israel Folau’s social media posts.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/risk-of-folau-style-harm-in-religious-freedom-plan-alan-joyce-20211126-p59ci1
    Pontificating Paul Kelly has his (long) say on the two big issues Morrison has on his plate – religious discrimination and ICAC bills.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/morrison-appeals-to-higher-order-with-religious-discrimination-bill/news-story/71aa8c06a1d79a4b441aa2e6ee496e07
    Karen Middleton explains what the religious discrimination bill is really about.
    https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2021/11/27/what-the-religious-discrimination-bill-really-about/163793160012963
    Traditionally, the final sitting weeks of the year can be dangerous times for political leaders. But even by those low expectations from watchers of politics, the past week has been a messy one for the PM, writes Katina Curtis.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/morrison-s-messy-week-20211125-p59c42.html
    The SMH says the federal government has moved to avoid another defeat in Parliament by sending a draft law on religious freedom to a joint committee of MPs and senators, after Morrison called in Liberal MP Bridget Archer over her surprise move on Thursday to vote against the Coalition on a national integrity commission.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/morrison-to-avoid-clash-on-religious-freedom-after-meeting-mp-who-crossed-floor-20211126-p59cho.html
    David Crowe thinks Scott Morrison wins when his MPs go rogue.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/why-scott-morrison-wins-when-his-mps-go-rogue-20211126-p59ckq.html
    Malcolm Knox argues that with religious discrimination, Morrison has taken a selective view of history to sell a bill Australia does not need. He says that listening to Morrison’s introduction of the bill, it was difficult to strike a balance between the hypocrisy and the rank ignorance. This was an aptly self-contradictory and glib history lesson to go with a self-contradictory and glib legislative idea, he continued.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/morrison-takes-a-selective-view-of-history-to-sell-a-bill-australia-does-not-need-20211125-p59c5s.html
    Scott Morrison has threatened an unprecedented federal intervention to install his preferred candidates into several NSW battleground seats, as he urged Liberal division presidents to ­impose discipline ahead of next year’s election, writes The Australian’s Max Maddison.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/risk-of-row-over-scott-morrisons-seat-picks/news-story/9e6fa1573cf2135da6185f7e04400a3f
    Lee Duffield points to the Liberal Party’s bloody history being forgotten as Morrison cries freedom.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/liberal-partys-bloody-history-forgotten-as-morrison-cries-freedom,15792
    With an election looming, and the surfeit of corporate welfare in recent memory, the peak welfare agency is trying to drag Australia’s JobSeeker rate, the second lowest in the OECD, back into the spotlight. However, with little pressure from the major parties, it seems like an uphill battle. Callum Foote reports.
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/wasted-jobkeeper-could-fund-jobseeker-rate-raise-for-five-years/
    Aaron Patrick reports that from their $20 million house on a battle-axe block bought with the proceeds of short-selling, high-frequency trading and speculative stocks, Daniel and Lyndell Droga are plotting an attack on the Morrison government for being too right-wing. This attack will occur in the seat of Wentworth where they recruited one of its community’s stars, Allegra Spender, to stand against Liberal MP Dave Sharma at the next federal election.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/the-short-seller-and-his-wife-going-after-morrison-20211123-p59bgj
    Greg Sheridan goes all bolshie, pointing to the lack of any new defence platforms in the works, a shocking weakness Dutton has inherited from a long line of ineffective defence ministers, working in effect at the direction of one of the great pacifist organisations in the world, the Australian Defence Department.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/inquirer/dutton-speaks-wise-words-on-china-challenge-but-our-military-needs-action/news-story/06234a9d1d804eb3071ed8a9e936704a
    Climate change is the dominant factor causing the increased size of bushfires in Australia’s forests, according to a landmark study that found the average annual area burned had grown by 800 per cent in the past 32 years, explain Mike Foley.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/csiro-study-proves-climate-change-driving-australia-s-800-percent-boom-in-bushfires-20211126-p59cgr.html
    Clay Lucas reports that Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton has told a coronial inquest into 45 deaths at St Basil’s that fewer coronavirus cases would have spread through the aged care home if its managers had co-operated more readily with a health order to stand down staff last year. But Sutton did concede that he never got an assurance from Canberra that its replacement workforce at the predominantly Greek-speaking home could adequately care for residents before ordering out all of its staff.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/if-st-basil-s-had-co-operated-fewer-residents-and-staff-would-have-got-covid-19-sutton-tells-inquiry-20211126-p59cd1.html
    Historic reforms to grant terminally ill people the right to end their lives have cleared the NSW lower house on the last parliamentary sitting day of 2021. Lucy Cormack says the bill to legalise voluntary assisted dying passed its final vote in the lower house on Friday, by 52 votes to 32, triggering hugs and applause between members who voted with their conscience on the landmark reforms. Now for the upper house.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/parliament-at-its-best-voluntary-assisted-dying-bill-passes-final-vote-in-nsw-lower-house-20211126-p59chi.html
    Dana Daniel writes that aged care providers will get immunity from criminal or civil prosecution for using physical and chemical restraints after the federal government amended its aged care bill, prompting outrage from advocates for older Australians. The government moved an eleventh-hour amendment to the bill before it went through the House of Representatives last month, giving providers immunity if they comply with a yet-to-be-created set of consent guidelines.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/astounding-aged-care-providers-to-get-immunity-from-prosecution-20211126-p59cgd.html
    Eight months after receiving the final report from the aged care royal commission, the Morrison government is spending millions of dollars on management consultancies rather than implementing key recommendations, reports Rick Morton. (And what they are getting is the typical MBA shit that often emanates from these consultants!)
    https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2021/11/27/government-outsources-aged-care-reform-management-consultants
    Far-right groups like The Base will radicalise Australians until we confront their beliefs, argues Jason Wilson.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/nov/26/far-right-groups-like-the-base-will-radicalise-australians-until-we-confront-their-beliefs
    The prime minister’s recent comments to an Australian-Indian audience displayed either an ignorance of history or a willingness to brush over inconvenient truths, complains Michael McKinley.
    https://johnmenadue.com/patronising-and-populist-another-morrison-speech/
    Political historian, Paul Strangio, writes that Daniel Andrews remains strong despite quarantine, branch-stacking and other blunders.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/victoria/premier-remains-strong-despite-quarantine-branch-stacking-and-other-blunders-20211126-p59ccl.html
    The World Health Organisation has declared the new strain of COVID-19 that emerged in South Africa a variant “of concern” and named it Omicron. Latika Bourke writes that WHO’s Technical Advisory Group said Omicron had a large number of mutations that made it concerning, and that preliminary evidence suggested “an increased risk of reinfection” compared to the other variants of concern, including Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta.
    https://www.theage.com.au/world/europe/who-classifies-south-africa-covid-strain-as-variant-of-concern-names-it-omicron-20211127-p59cnq.html
    Detained in the same hotel from where Victoria’s second wave escaped, Covid-positive refugees describe conditions that breach the recommendations of the quarantine inquiry and feel like ‘torture’, writes Elle Marsh.
    https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2021/11/27/this-torture-hotel-inside-the-park-hotel-outbreak/163793160012962
    A new Covid variant is no surprise when rich countries are hoarding vaccines, says former UK Prime Minister, Gordon Brown.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/nov/26/new-covid-variant-rich-countries-hoarding-vaccines
    Public servants have been told to rush back to offices as federal departments bring forward the end of COVID work-from-home arrangements, in what the main public sector union describes as a “spooked and cavalier response” to Coalition government calls for a return to workplaces.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7527057/spooked-public-servants-rushed-back-to-offices-after-ministers-wfh-warning/?cs=14329
    The truth is becoming increasingly unimportant in our politics and Parliament — and this bodes ill for civilised society and the survival of democracy, laments John Frew.
    https://johnmenadue.com/when-the-truth-is-inconvenient-how-lying-allows-politicians-to-propser/
    Adele Ferguson tells us that the national regulator AHPRA is under the spotlight in a parliamentary inquiry headed by Greens senator Janet Rice, who earlier this week announced a four-month extension to the inquiry to accommodate hearings and investigate allegations about cosmetic surgery following a media exposé by The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and ABC’s Four Corners.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/consumer-affairs/unimaginable-things-whistleblowers-lift-lid-on-cosmetic-surgery-underbelly-20211126-p59cje.html
    In this evaluation of developers and the construction industry, Elizabeth Knight laments that the glorification of greed has left Sydney with a vast backlog of misery. It’s a disturbing read.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-glorification-of-greed-has-left-sydney-with-a-vast-backlog-of-misery-20211125-p59c40.html

    Cartoon Corner

    Alan Moir

    Warren Brown

    Jon Kudelka

    David Rowe

    Peter Broelman

    Cathy Wilcox

    Glen Le Lievre

    Andrew Dyson

    Matt Golding


    Simon Letch


    Mark David

    Jim Pavlidis

    John Shakespeare



    Michael Leunig

    Leak

  7. After reading Peter Hartcher’s article – mostly quoting Jacqui Lambie and Bridget Archer, to great effect – this tweet seems to fit.

    Did Scott Morrison haul in George Christensen, Gerard Rennick and Matt Canavan in for an explanation when they crossed the floor?He surely wouldn’t treat male and female MPs differently would he? https://t.co/9qxRtM84UV— Tim Watts MP (@TimWattsMP) November 26, 2021

  8. The federal Labor leader, Anthony Albanese, has called for Australia to close the border to southern African countries.

    He said:

    The Omicron outbreak is a major concern that should be of concern to all Australians. We know the impact that Delta had when it came here. And we can’t afford to be complacent. I make this point, Scott Morrison always waits until a problem becomes a crisis. And then he waits until a crisis becomes a political issue before he acts. He must act today.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2021/nov/27/australia-live-news-updates-nation-on-alert-over-new-covid-strain-warragamba-dam-spills

  9. Too little, too late, as usual with this government.

    So just to recap the measures announced today by the Australian government.

    Australia’s borders are closed to anyone (except for Australian citizens) arriving from nine southern African countries: South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Lesotho, Eswatini, the Seychelles, Malawi and Mozambique.
    Australians attempting to return from those countries will be subject to hotel quarantine.
    All flights from those nine countries to Australia are suspended.
    Restrictions will apply to to international students and skilled migrants arriving from travel bubbles, and who have been to those countries in the past 14 days.
    Anyone who has already arrived in Australia from one of the nine listed countries must quarantine and get tested immediately

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/live/2021/nov/27/australia-live-news-updates-nation-on-alert-over-new-covid-strain-warragamba-dam-spills

    This variant has already been detected outside Africa in Belgium, Israel and Hong Kong, but does this farce of a government realise that?

    Scovid is doing his usual head in the sand act, waiting for it to become a crisis before he acts then telling us a pack of lies about what he has (not) done. All he is concerned about is how this new strain could help him win the election.

  10. Why demonstrate outside the ABC, and why do it during a bushfire emergency?

    FFS these people are dumb!

  11. Here I was thinking I’d be keeping Razz company for a couple of hours. No. No way. No visitors allowed. I’m pretty dumb, I should have realised. Anyway, she’s got her wheels (hopefully, I had to leave them at reception and apparently the security guard would take them to her). I had also sent some fresh pj’s but forgot her toothbrush and paste. No worries, rang grandson who was going through B’dale and asked him to drop some in at the front desk for her. While typing this, I’d also forgot her comb, well she has just had a hair cut some hopefully she can smooth it down with her fingers.

    When I rang to say her “legs” were there, I had a chat with a nurse first. She is finally getting her infusion of steroids, but I didn’t tell her that she’ll probably be there until Monday if not longer. Quite glad I don’t have to face her for a day or two. She will be livid. She hates the hospital. Loves the nursing staff and cleaners and all, but prefers to be home. I’m feeling a bit lost with nothing much to do.

    • Picking on one lone woman is OK for him, but he did not drag the five senators who crossed the floor this week into his office to explain themselves because three of them were (allegedly) men and he was afraid because he would have been outnumbered.

      He is such a coward, like all bullies..

  12. G Hunt has apparently suspended direct flights from Southern Africa. I am sure I read somewhere that there have been no such flights for 18 months.

  13. Venting again, please scroll by.

    Rang Razz to see how her afternoon went. She’s pleased her wheely bin is there, although she is not allowed to use it. Thrilled to get her toothbrush and paste. Having a ball with the staff, even conned them into giving her a shower, although she has no comb, told her it’s the fashion to have spikey hair.

    Asked about her cortisone infusion. No go, they rang her Neuro in Caufield, He is just a young one, I think Razz has had MS longer than he has been alive. He said no. Razz has been having the infusions, about 10 in in 35 years, and they do make a difference. Will try to contact him and explain the difference it makes. I know things have changed over time with treatment, but Razz decided quality of life is better than quantity. She has said she just wants to come home and not do anymore medical stuff. I just want to cry. Sorry.

    • Cry all you want. No-one here will mind.

      Would this baby neurologist consider another corticosteroid? There are several commonly used for infusions. With only 10 in 35 years I don’t think she is over-using this treatment and it should all come down to what makes her comfortable.

      Good luck with phoning him

  14. Leone

    Thanks. I had a cry, rang Razz’s sister, had a cry, we decided that I will ring her doctor on Monday and see if we can progress from there. Onward and upward, her sister said they will come up ( from Melbourne) and get things sorted, riding on their white horses with shields and amour if necessary.

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