SHIRTFRONT FRIDAY RAFFLES

Hello once again patrons to another edition of Friday Night Raffles.

In light of the one of the most monumentally stupid idiotic remarks a so called Prime Minister of Australia could make I give you a little montage of how it has received.

 

The Idiot gets the ball rolling. What a tool

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Putin hears about it

After changing his undies from uncontrollable laughter he responds

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The Russkies don,t seem too happy with The Idiot,and suggest he may be diseased.

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switchback-abbott-ratMaybe this will be another little nail into the coffin of the Stupid incompetent idiotic moron that sadly is the Prime Minister of Australia, The day he is gone cannot come soon enough.

 

BTW  It’s Raffle Night And

 

As it is one of my favourite times of the year we will be having not just A Melbourne Cup Sweep but also one for the Caulfield cup Tomorrow and Cox Plate the following week .

I will post when the draw opens early on the sat morning. First in best dressed. Suitable prizes will be awarded to the winners .

 

Good Luck to all

672 thoughts on “SHIRTFRONT FRIDAY RAFFLES

  1. http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/20/us-mideast-crisis-usa-airdrops-idUSKCN0I904X20141020

    U.S. military says air-drops weapons for Kurdish fighters near Kobani
    By Arshad Mohammed and Tom Perry
    WASHINGTON/BEIRUT Mon Oct 20, 2014 3:48am EDT

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2014/10/20/243946_obamas-decision-to-aid-kobani.html

    Obama’s decision to aid Kobani puts him squarely at odds with Turkey’s Erdogan
    By Roy Gutman
    McClatchy Foreign Staff October 20, 2014

    http://www.news.com.au/finance/money/thousands-of-aussie-middleincome-families-may-be-hit-with-rise-in-childcare-costs/story-e6frfmcr-1227095477719

    Thousands of Aussie middle-income families may be hit with rise in childcare costs
    October 19, 2014 3:52PM
    Lauren Wilson Social Affairs Writer
    News Corp Australia Network

    CHILDCARE would become significantly more expensive for thousands of middle-income families under a proposed overhaul of the early childcare education sector.

    New modelling, obtained by News Corp from advocacy group The Parenthood, reveals the extent of the hip-pocket sting many families would face under reforms proposed by the Productivity Commission (PC).

    http://www.afr.com/p/business/marketing_media/vice_news_opens_in_australia_aimed_rvXC33D6JAD43xzQPZqx9I

    Vice News opens in Australia aimed at younger market
    PUBLISHED: 19 hours 9 MINUTES AGO | UPDATE: 5 hours 1 MINUTES AGO
    Jessica Gardner

    Youth publisher Vice Media has chosen Australia as one of seven new bureaus it will open around the globe to create video and multimedia content to feed its rapidly growing Vice News business.

    The company began as a ­Canadian music magazine in 1994, but has built up a portfolio of online and broadcast outlets aimed at young consumers. It launched Vice News in March, with coverage of conflict in Crimea, and has quickly built a reputation for in-depth coverage of complex issues.

    http://www.crikey.com.au/2014/10/20/the-30-year-history-of-trying-and-failing-to-make-abc-cuts/

    The 30-year history of trying (and failing) to make ABC cuts
    Bernard Keane | Oct 20, 2014 1:13PM

    Successive governments have let the ABC adapt to its environment rather than take on the difficult task of discussing what public broadcasting should mean.

    http://www.crikey.com.au/2014/10/20/how-the-abc-spends-its-money/

    How the ABC spends its money
    Bernard Keane | Oct 20, 2014 1:13PM

    Numerous reviews into the ABC have come up with the same conclusion: the ABC needs more money, not less, to do what it is chartered to do.

  2. Abbott’s War is being paid for by cuts to defence pay.

    Average increases of nearly 4 per cent a year had been earmarked for the Defence Department in the May budget to meet its increased salary costs over the next four years. But the government is now offering a paltry 1.5 per cent.

    The revelation suggests the government, which has added another $1 billion-plus to the deficit through the new military involvement in Iraq and counter-terrorism measures at home, is recouping some of those costs from Diggers

    http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/diggers-pay-may-suffer-for-war-effort-20141019-118ai4.html#ixzz3Gfo5elKa

  3. Leonie from several hours ago…

    Howard didn’t lose an election and his seat because people were sick of his wars. He lost them because of a combination of Workchoices and the march of time. In isolation, he may have hung on. But not with both albatrosses slung around that scrawny chicken neck of his.

    You talk more sense than most here, particularly with your refusal to join this particular herd in beatifying Gillard. In that sense, I agree with you. She is so far ahead of Abbott that he can’t hear the band. But she had feet of clay, like all of us. She is well above average but certainly no saint. Or saviour. Or genius.

    I also agree with you in not following that same herd on these endless Abbott furphies. His citizenship. His daughter. His supposed earlier crimes. Even if they were all 100% true, the media would see him clear, just as they are doing with Cormann today. There is no silver bullet in any of this. Remember “Peak Abbott”? I do. Many, many times.

    You are too smart to fall for the war thing. The reality is that most Australians couldn’t give a continental whether we are there or not and a disturbing proportion of the population get something resembling a sexual thrill at the prospect of splattering a few thousand rag heads. In the public bars and at the footy and in Bunnings and in the queue at Hoyts they love it. Please don’t delude yourself. You’re way better than that.

  4. Roy
    I did say one of the reasons, not THE reason for Howard’s loss was his wars. I know that a lot of things combined to see him off- the ‘it’s time’ factor, his treatment of refugees, his lies and his damn wars. Enough voters were sick of some or all of it to change a government.

    I still think Abbott’s war mongering and compulsive lying will eventually go against him. Those who are happy to see a few ‘ragheads’ blown up .will always vote Coalition, they are rusted-on. The hope is that there are enough who will be sickened by Abbott’s war-mongering and lies to boot him out. It might happen, it might not, but I have to hope.The really depressing thing is it pretty much depends on how far the MSM are willing to go in promoting Abbott come the next election.

    It’s nice to have someone agree with so much of what I say. Sometimes I feel like a bit of a square peg in a round Pub, if you get what I mean.

  5. Leone,

    The only reason I don’t chime in with

    more often is that it would bore the patrons, and you in particular, to distraction.

  6. [a paltry 1.5 per cent.]

    0.5 % more than the rest of the PS are being offered for the next 3 years.

  7. What a hoot!

    You’d have more sympathy for the SMH if they weren’t printing every jerk of Bachelor Blake’s genital member, as if it was real news.

    I have rarely seen an editorial with such lack of self-awareness, including disparaging references to the “24 hour news cycle”, to which the SMH is a hopelessly addicted junkie.

    Matthias Cormann throws the switch to vaudeville
    The 24/7 media cycle – or what Liberal frontbencher Malcolm Turnbull has called the 60-second news cycle – has played some part in calling the game of politics one-liner by one-liner. While quality journalism requires balance, fairness and in-depth debate, the new media landscape tends to reward the opposite – or at least politicians think it does. So they offer more extreme words, opinions and presentation to gain a publicity edge over their rivals.

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/smh-editorial/mathias-cormann-throws-the-switch-to-vaudeville-20141020-118k59.html#ixzz3Gfz3TOhQ

    They forgot to say, “And we print ever effing word of it, verbatim.”

  8. Abbott’s War is being paid for by cuts to defence pay.

    After 60 seconds with a calculator, I pointed this out 5 days ago…

  9. Leonie,

    “The really depressing thing is it pretty much depends on how far the MSM are willing to go in promoting Abbott come the next election”

    I can help with that. The answer is as far as they need to,as long as it takes and whatever it takes. No Abbott lie, along with any perceived Labor error, is too small. The fix, as they say, has been in forever. It’s just that these days, it’s on steroids, crystal meth, elephant juice and with a 12 volt battery in the saddle along with a nuclear powered cattle prod up its arse. Take Cormann for example. He makes a clear own goal but because a Labor nobody carelessly, but correctly, calls him a dickhead, every gun in the MSM arsenal is turned on him.

    I’ll say it yet again. Australia votes on one issue and one issue only. Race. But every third or fourth election the punters wake up and wonder where all hard earned (not by them but by their forbears) “rights” went. They grudgingly, more grudgingly each time, vote Labor in and then Murdoch goes apeshit and the campaign to get the rightful rulers back where they belong goes into an overdrive gear that didn’t exist the last time this happened.

    Rinse, repeat and despair.

  10. It sounds to me like you two, Royo and Leone, are jaded to the point of cynicism in the politics of this country…sure, Gillard had her faults, but even before she became a contender in the new Rudd govt’, she had showed class…I remember saying to a mate that ” I didn’t like Rudd because he was a ‘religo’..and I never trust religos..I would like to see Gillard get the gig because the nation needs a female leader for at least two terms to kill off the macho politics”….she was good..bloody good for a politician….and damn the bastards that did for her !

    You can have two types of politics…the theatrical style, like we have in the “western democracies”, where confected momentum has to be built to engage the electoral ‘audience’ ..momentum built mostly on hyperbole and constructed outrage……then there are the “real” politics and politicians….you don’t want them…not really…Joe Stalin was a ‘real’ politician…as was Adolph, THEY dealt in ‘hard-core’ politics…they were the “real-deal”…you don’t want real politics, not really…it is ugly, it is brutal…it is very, very dirty…ISIS is ‘real politics’ at work no, Gillard was a damn decent politician….I could take a lot more of her!

  11. Roy

    [I’ll say it yet again. Australia votes on one issue and one issue only. Race. ]

    It’s never entered my mind on a voting day.

  12. Another candidate for the man-biting award

    The total number of government requests for Australians’ phone, location and web data is far higher than government agencies are disclosing, with more than 500,000 separate requests for information made last year.

    The latest annual report from the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) has revealed that there was 582,727 requests for phone, web browsing and location data – commonly known as “metadata” – that can reveal detailed information about a person’s personal lives and associations.

    This figure is at odds with the more widely cited number of 300,000 a year, which is disclosed in the annual telecommunications interception reports made by the attorney general’s departments.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/oct/20/australian-government-metadata-requests-far-higher-than-disclosed

  13. CTar,
    But you don’t take your instructions from the Daily Telegraph or Gloria. Millions do. And act on them…

  14. The estimates hearings also saw an unusual scene when Greens senator Sarah Hanson-Young was prevented from tabling a document containing key allegations that have been made against Save the Children staff on Nauru

    The Daily Smelly could publish that document, but the senate will not allow it to be tabled.

  15. jaycee
    “Gillard was a damn decent politician….I could take a lot more of her!”
    I agree, I hoped she would have at least a second term. All I’m saying is don’t turn her into a deity. She made mistakes, as we all do, and some of those mistakes led to our loss of a fine PM. The lady admits to her mistakes in her book.

  16. Leone,

    I’d prefer to say that some of those mistakes contributed to our loss of a fine PM.

    She had many more forces ranged against her than have confronted most of our left-of-centre PMs.

  17. Roy

    An aside.

    In my time as a Public Servant an ‘indigenous’ guy of about 40 turned up. A lifter and carrier in the PS. With a wife and 3 children. 20 years as a fettler for NSW Rail.

    He came from very close to where I spent my childhood and also smart.

    No divide.

    He was reluntant to take a job at ATSIC.

    My advice, pay your supperanuation and then some, and catch the train.

  18. It wasn’t Gillard’s mistakes that lost us a fine PM….I have to agree with Royo on this one, as I have railed many times before..the effing MSM. did for us and did for us badly..now they are wretched little traitors…nothing more…wretched little traitors, who sold their country out to the shifty turd we now have as PM….you can’t get much lower than that….not without a back-hoe.

  19. Yet another idiotological brain-fart of the LNP.

    Splitting up the APS and playing departments/agencies against each other might have saved a few bucks at face value – but only if you ignore the time and $$$ spent (wasted) negotiating a bunch of largely duplicate agreements. (1 APS vs. 97 agencies vs. 166,495 employees.)

    “I had the perfect solution to the Iraq crisis – but the Ministry of Silly Walks paid better.”

  20. Jaeger,

    Short-term apparent gain.

    Long-term real cost.

    But hey, let’s not tell that to the wide boys.

  21. The difference is that Labor people will discuss their leader’s feat of clay, We will never get a Venus de Milo or Statue of David, because there will always be rough edges. But the Libs hero worship anyone who gets them into government and are deaf and blind to their faults. Indeed, in tolerating or even admiring Tony Abbott, Libs show how they are willing to trade conscience for their version of success.

  22. A very insightful comment, Puffy.

    I hope to respond tomorrow, but that depends on the degree of shadow over me.

    I think.

  23. One thing that’s annoying me about polling is this: Where the hell is the polling for the election that’s a little over five weeks away?

  24. OK, the war didn’t work so what’s next?

    A saturation media campaign by News Ltd to try and convince the electorate that Abbott is the reincarnation of Tonatiuh the Aztec Sun God and that lefties must be sacrificed to him or else famine and pestilence will ravage the land?

    Bit over the top? Well, it’ll probably be something between that and what’s happening now in levels of stupidity.

  25. You can only drive on for so long on a flat tyre before it starts to shred…I reckon the LNP. has about reached the “shredding apart ” moment.

  26. @GL

    I read elsewhere that Ipsos (a new pollster that seems to be replacing Nielsen) might be releasing a Victorian state poll in the next few days.

  27. David looks a strapping young buck. When I went to the Louvre in Paris I was struck by how many of the statues of nude men had the penis snapped off. The prudes must have got to them.

  28. jaegar
    Beautfiul,
    We have a bare landscape that is devoid of beautiful statues. We need more public art in Australia.
    Meanwhile in Adelaide’s Rundle Mall…

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